Brooklyn in Love and at War

History of World War Two Told Through Letters

Victory Mail

with 5 comments

Ah, that’s right, history! Of late, I’ve been caught up in the love story and the storytelling aspect of this blog. Let’s do some more general historical investigation.

In the upper left hand corner of “V-Mail” you’ll see the “Passed By Naval Censor” Stamp. In the letter below you’ll notice how conscious of the censor my grandfather was. He writes “we are where we are supposed to be.” In more content filled letters this will gain importance.

Dearest lover,

This is a hastily written note to let you know that we are where we are supposed to be and after this we may head for home. It will take a little time yet, so dear, keep writing to me.

I hope we find some mail from home and I shall write a long letter as soon as time allows it. With all my love to you and baby and millions of kisses

Alex

I’ll write later.

Let’s examine the outside of the letter. The airplane on the stamp is certainly emblematic of WWII. I’m unsure as to why there is a stamp when the bottom of the V-Mail instructions states, “V-Mail letters may be sent free of postage by members of the Armed Forces. When sent by others postage must be prepaid at domestic rates (3 c ordinary mail, 6 c if domestic air mail service is desired when mailed in the U.S.)” Alex was a member of the armed forces so why is there a stamp? My theory is that the postage to the U.S. was free but the stamp covers postage once the letter has arrived in the country. (If someone knows the correct reasoning, I’d like to know. If I figure it out, I’ll share it.)

V-Mail stood for Victory Mail. All V-Mail was written on this type of standardized paper that functioned as an envelope as well (as seen above). The letters were opened, censored, photographed and the negatives were sent to the U.S. rather than the full sized letters. This saved shipping space for war materials.

On the day this letter was written – October 21, 1944 – the first German city, Aachen, was taken by the Allied powers. I haven’t delved deeply into WWII history thus far but I find it most striking how little the events of the war, as we learn about them in textbooks, finds its way into the letters. The later letters are full of hope for a swift return home. Censorship, prices and pay, the end of the war, and political upheaval will certainly be present in the letters as we go. But when it comes down to the day to day communication, we hear mainly about barracks and chores, baby clothes and visits from relatives.

I find it fascinating that personal letters were becoming standardized. They were such a prevalent and crucial part of everyday life. Everyone’s letters were so personal and so universal.

Thus far, Brooklyn daily life has seemed more present in the letters than the war abroad, but this is just the tip of the iceberg.

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Written by Molly

June 6, 2010 at 11:07 pm

Posted in Uncategorized

Tagged with , ,

5 Responses

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  1. You bring those times to life and put it into context for me. Thank you, Molly.

    Adrienne

    June 8, 2010 at 8:54 am

  2. Fascinating…. could it mean that Alex is already in the country — perhaps Boston or another port — and is mailing this, rather than sending it from a ship? That would explain why it isn’t a photo but the handwritten version itself. He may have written it at sea but held onto it until he landed…. just a thought.

    D

    David

    June 8, 2010 at 9:16 am

  3. Are there any clues in the return address? Any idea how the Fleet Post Office works?

    Zach

    June 14, 2010 at 3:43 pm

  4. [...] both Alex and Sylvia that were written on the same day. October 21st, 1944 (Sylvia’s Letter , Alex’s Letter). Both are fairly hastily written notes that technically overlap (and are in some ways parallel) [...]

  5. [...] See more at the BNY blog. Follow Molly (@Mollyr318 and @BKInLoveAndWar) or read her blog here. [...]


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